STORY TIME | say no to ticket scalping.

So here I am, day one of SWOTVAC, 11 days before my first exam in JD, probably not the best time to be writing up a blog post, but hey, rules aren’t important, I’m not type A (both lies).

Coldplay is coming to Melbourne in December, probably one of the best news I’ve heard all year. Naturally, I rounded up my friends who I went to the 2012 Coldplay concert with, to relive our memories, and let Chris Martin serenade us once more with his beautiful voice.

After consulting Google, I found out that there were two pre-sales, and the general sale. The AMEX pre-sale was out of the question, but Live Nation’s one was definitely where I was going to get those tickets, or so I thought. Long and behold, comes Thursday 26 April, the day of the pre-sale. I was in class, unfortunately, which meant I was 3 minutes late to the party, and all Gold General Admission tickets were sold out. No biggie, I’ll just grab them at the general sale, I told myself.

Today is the day. Learning from my mistake last time, I was on the Ticketmaster page from 1.50pm (general sale starts at 2pm), and there was already a countdown on the page, the kind that makes your heart race. As soon as it hit 2pm, the page refreshed itself, and I went to town with selecting the tickets, proving I’m not a robot, the whole shabam. And that’s when it happened. “Sorry, no results match your search”. I was confused, to say the least, since usually if tickets are sold out, it would just say “tickets in the category you’re searching for has been exhausted”, or something along those lines. I messaged Ticketmaster straight away, for some clarification, and while I was on their Facebook page, I saw that under the photo promoting the concert, a bunch of other people seemed to be experiencing the same problem. So I thought to myself, maybe their server just can’t handle the traffic, all is well. So I kept refreshing, refreshing, and refreshing. That site was worse than Student Portal on timetable days, and that’s saying a lot.

Half an hour later, after receiving no response from Ticketmaster, I’ve pretty much given up and was ready to accept my fate. That’s when I realised that they have read my message, but did not reply. And that’s when shit hit the fan for me, because if that’s not bad customer service, I don’t know what is. So being the (first year) law student I am, with plenty of legal terms and jargons under my belt (due to the solid weekend of cramming), I brought up the ACCC. I’ll just attach a printscreen for this part of the story.

I didn’t attach the printscreen of FTA on purpose I swear LOL
WOW please ignore the typos, and the shockingly poor grammar, I was mad okay.

Isn’t it interesting how they replied to me one minute after I threatened to report them to the ACCC?

Anyway, clearly I wasn’t going to get a straight answer from them, but being the slightly OCD person I am, I did some research. First, I went to the Facebook event pageΒ and saw that a bunch of people were already looking to buy tickets. Furthermore, on Ticketmaster’s own Resale page, literally hundreds of ticket were up for grab, here’s the catch though, normal tickets were listed for as high as $800, and VIP packages were up to a shocking $4,600. It was the same situation on eBay, tickets were around $280 for Gold General Admission.

What does all these numbers tell us? That a large number of tickets were “sold” to people and/or corporations who planned to resell them from the start. I don’t know about you, but that made me pretty God damn angry. All other things aside, let’s just think about the fact that Ticketmaster allows individuals to resell tickets on their website, with no cap, literally two minutes after they have bought then. How is that a fair system? And that’s not even considering the fact that they may themselves be directing a large portion of tickets straight to their Resale system, in order to make a profit much higher than face value.

I’m sure you all know one of Gandhi’s most quoted quotes: “Be the change you want to see in the world.” I don’t usually take that approach, because like the rest of you, I often feel like some things are just beyond my power to change. But this isn’t.

I have started a petition on Change.org, in order to raise awareness to the issue of ticket scalping, especially the role Ticketmaster plays in the process. If you have had similar experiences, or just want to help, then please please please, sign the petition, every signature, literally, actually, counts. I am planning to use the petition to show the public stance against this matter, when I make a formal complaint to ACCC, I don’t know when that will be exactly, since I have no idea how many signatures I can even get. If it hits plateau after a couple of days, so be it.

Again, please sign the petition, it literally takes two minutes to sign up to Change.org, and while you’re there, there are a number of other (more important, you might say) petitions there, which might pique your interest.

Click here to sign (here’s a fun game, how many times have I already linked the petition?). And I’ll keep you guys updated on the progress.

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