Sonido!

Sonido! specialises in Colombian cuisine, something that I don’t have too much experience nor knowledge with. The small cafe is vibrant and colourful, offering a glimpse into the tenacious Latino culture.

Iced Coffee

Starting off with an iced coffee, the tall glass of drink was quite acidic but easy to drink nonetheless.

Chorizo Arepa – $14.00

Arepas is sort of like bread made from corn colour, meaning that it’s gluten free for the celiacs out there. The arepa was soft and a little chewy, being the perfect vehicle for the chargrilled chorizo. Speaking of which, the long slice of chorizo was juicy and flavoursome, probably one of the best that I’ve had. Paired with the cool salsa and guacamole on the side, this was a simply but satisfying plate.

I was too full by this point to try out the Portuguese tart, which I’ve heard great things about. Guess that just means I’ll have to return with a bigger appetite.

How to get here:
Sonido! is located on Gertrude Street, ten minutes walk from Parliament station.

Sonido! Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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Punjabi Curry Cafe

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Curries is one of the ultimate comfort food in my book. Meat and vegetables cooked down in a large pot, with a variety of herbs and spices, and paired with plenty of rice and naan, ticking off everything that’s needed to create perfect Winter dinner. Punjabi Curry Cafe certainly looked promising, with its dark and sleek setting, and a tandoor situated towards the back of the restaurant.

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Pani Puri (8 pcs) – $7.99

Pani Puri is a common street food in India. The delicate puri shell is filled with a mixture of potato, onion and chutney.

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Pani Puri (8 pcs) – $7.99

Although small, each bite created a firework of flavour inside your mouth.

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Clockwise from the top: Beef Masala – $15.99; Butter Chicken – $14.99; Punjabi Kadai Paneer – $14.99
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Beef Masala – $15.99

I really enjoyed the beef masala, the gravy was thick and fragrant, and the meat were very tender.

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Butter Chicken – $14.99

I use butter chicken as my benchmark for all Indian restaurants, and the rendition at Punjabi Curry Cafe, although creamy, was nothing to write home about. The pieces of chicken were a little dry, and although there was plenty of sauce, it was quite run of the mill, for lack of a better term.

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Punjabi Kadai Paneer – $14.99

We wanted to try something a little more adventurous and landed on the Kadai Paneer, the sliced paneer were cooked in a thick tomato based gravy with a heavy hit of spices, Kadai masala in particular. It was definitely an interesting dish to say the least, and its lightness was appreciated considering that the other curries were on the heavy side of things.

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Saffron Rice – $4.99

The fluffy saffron rice was the perfect vehicle for all of the curries.

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Garlic Cheese Naan – $7.99

Fresh the tandoor, the greasy garlic cheese naan was delicious on its own, and even better when dipped into the sauce of the curries.

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Pista Kulfi – $6.99

We ended the meal with some pistachio kulfi, i.e. Indian ice cream. The ice cream had the texture of a solid sorbet, and the pistachio flavour was quite prominant.

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Punjabi Curry Cafe is what you would expect from a neighbourhood Indian restaurant, the curries were of decent quality, and it would be a great place to hit up whether you’re feeling like a heavy-duty Indian dinner out, or just looking to grabbing some takeaway on the way home.

How to get here:
Punjabi Curry Cafe is located on Johnston Street, catch tram #86 Waterfront City Docklands to Bundoora RMIT and get off at Johnston Street/Smith Street, and the restaurant is a short three minutes walk away.

I dined as a guest of Punjabi Curry Cafe.

Punjabi Curry Cafe Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Mesa Verde

There’s a lot of good stuff sprawled across the floors of Curtain House, and Mesa Verde is one of them. The drinks menu here is endless; it’s a no brainer then for the restaurant to be a popular choice for after work drinks, but we were here for the food.

Mesa Verde appears to have had a menu change since I’ve visited a couple of months ago, apologies in advance if you see something that you particularly fancy that isn’t on the current menu!

Tortilla Chips – $12.00

The house made tortilla chips is much better than the supermarket variety, with some added thickness that ensured it wouldn’t crack even when you’re scooping up an obscene amount of guacamole with it. Speaking of, the guacamole was creamy with a zing, and there was more than enough to go around with the chips.

Salmon Tostada – $7.00

Tostadas are great, first of all, it’s just a fun word that rolls off your tongue, and secondly, it’s essentially a crunchy taco, need I say more? The tostadas at Mesa Verde were topped off with the creamiest avocado, that had a mousse-like consistency, which went really well with the plump and fresh slices of salmon. Although this was messy to eat, the flavours meant that it was worth it.

Charred Corn – $8.00

I love charred corns, especially when they’re smothered in morita mayo and cotiya cheese, all lightened up with a squeeze of lime. Again, messy to eat, but well worth it.

School Prawns – $9.00

The school prawns were coated in an addictive layer of spicy seasoning, and would have definitely went well with a margarita. The pickled green chilli hiding behind the prawns had more than just a kick to it, so eat at your own risk.

Pork Taco – $7.00

To finish things off, we shared a couple of tacos. First up was the pork taco. the shredded pork lacked the oomph that I was looking for, but the chilli salsa did help it out, and the pickled radish gave it some texture.

Baja Fish Taco – $7.00

The baja fish taco was my pick of the night, although it took a ridiculous amount of time to pick off all the corianders. The fish itself was cooked in a light batter, and was perfectly tender inside. The herb aioli was quite mild, I think I would’ve preferred the smoke marita mayo here instead.

Given that drinks takes centre stage at Mesa Verde, it was nice to see that the restaurant did not neglect the food either. The bill does add up with tacos here and charred corns there, but it did have a groovy vibe (is this still a thing? asking for a friend), and I can certainly see myself returning and trying out some of the drinks.

How to get here:
Mesa Verde is located on the 6th floor of Curtain, on Swanston Street, just a short five minutes walk from Melbourne Central.

Mesa Verde Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

The Jolimont

I hate hiking. There I said it. So in order to turn this upsetting event into a somewhat joyous one, and to ensure that we have enough energy for the actual hike, we made a detour and stopped at The Jolimont for brunch before heading off to Wilsons Prom.

French Maple – $17.00

Balance is the key to life, hence why the French Maple was a no-brainer to order on this particular occasion. The French toast was quite dense, but made for an interesting base for the essential toppings of eggs benedict. The runny egg yolks actually helped to counteract the richness of the hollandaise, which was made with more butter than usual. This is definitely not for those who are not willing to clot up their arteries first thing in the morning, as its indulgence cannot be ignored.

Smoked Salmon Eggs Benedict – $17.00

The smoked salmon eggs benedict swapped out English muffins for hash browns, which stayed crispy throughout the meal. The generous layers of vibrant smoked salmon made this a more-than-substantial plate. We did think that the obligatory side salad with the sole ingredient of rocket was a bit heavy-handed.

The Jolimont screamed neighbourhood cafe from top to bottom, with regulars being greeted by their first names by the waitstaff, simple and no-fuss menu, and a price-point that’s well below what I’ve become accustomed to with cafes that are located closer to the CBD.

Although the menu may not appear exciting to some, it was a satisfying meal regardless, with each dish done well. I’m happy to add The Jolimont to my list of cafes to return to if I’m in the mood for something local and comforting, with no frills attached.

How to get here:
The Jolimont is located on Jolimont Road, catch bus #765 Mitcham to Box Hill and get off at Longbrae Avenue, and you’ll be at the door of the cafe.

The Jolimont Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Delhi Streets

Hidden away from the foot traffic, Delhi Streets lures diners in with a tentalising selection of Indian street food. Despite its location, diners were pouring in and out of the restaurant throughout the night. Being the keen beans we were and arriving just after 6pm, we safely secured some bar seats, and were excited to sample what was on offer inside the colourful and contemporary space.

Chaat Platter – $22.00

Being known for serving up street food, it should be no surprise that Delhi Streets had an extensive selection of entrees, some of which I haven’t seen elsewhere. Wanting to try a bit of everything, we opted for the chatt platter, which came filled with four types of chatt, ready to be devoured.

Chaat Platter – $22.00

The pani puri is something has quickly become a must-order for me. The novelty of pouring in the spiced water never seems to wear off, and the combination of the crunchy shell and soft potatoes is a great way to get your tastebuds excited for what’s to come.

Chaat Platter – $22.00

The aloo tikki was light and fluffy, the curry spices bringing layers of flavour to the potatoes.

Chaat Platter – $22.00

Smothered in tamarind chutney and yoghurt, papri chaat is the Indian counterpart to nachos. The flour crackers did the heavy lifting for the chickpea and potatoes, and it was a light and refreshing change to the traditional nachos.

Chaat Platter – $22.00

Bhel puri is reminiscent of a grain salad, and it was seriously texture city, with its combination of puffed rice and sev, i.e. small pieces of fried noodles. The tangy flavours come from the bhel chutney, rounding it up to be a salad not to be missed.

Special Thali – $16.00

The Special Thali is a good dish to order if you can’t decide on one curry to settle on, as you’re given the option to choose three of the available thalis. The butter chicken was thick and creamy, and was really taking comfort food to the next level. The lamb vindaloo, on the other hand, had a nice kick to it, and the chunks of lamb was extremely tender. The vegetarian option came in the form of lentil curry, which was mild and flavoursome. The accompanying naan was soft and pillowy, and were great for soaking up the various sauces. All in all, this was an extremely satisfying platter to share between two.

Taking on a refined and contemporary approach that doesn’t compensate on flavour, it is easy to see why Delhi Streets is loved by many, of which now I am one of. I will definitely be back to try more things on its extensive menu.

How to get here:
Delhi Streets is located on Katherine Place, a short six minutes walk from Southern Cross Station.

Delhi Streets Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Gukbab

Gukbab literally means soup with rice, which is a way that some Korean stews are meant to be had, by mixing the rice through the soup and eating the whole thing together, almost like an instant version of congee. I had the dish a few times when I travelled to Korea (blog posts coming in March!), and was excited to see a restaurant in Melbourne that specialises in it.

It’s easy to miss the restaurant, with no clear signage and being scattered in the same building with a few other restaurants each with bigger signs. However, once you enter through the glass doors, the strong scent of sizzling bulgogi and Army stews will let you know that you’re in the right place.

Banchan

The free banchans consisted of a pasta salad, pickled onion, and your obligatory kimchi. Nothing out of the ordinary here, and they were all fun to munch on after we placed our order.

Kimchi Jiggae – $15.00

Despite there being plenty of soups and stews that were harder to find in other Korean restaurants, we ordered the classic kimchi jiggae on this occasion. I make kimchi jiggae quite often at home, especially during Winter, but this was definitely better than my homemade version. It had a great depth of flavour in the soup itself, that’s made up of more than just kimchi and gochujang, which made for a great base for the sweet potato noodle and pork in the stew.

Japchae – $16.00

Japchae is a common Korean dish that is essentially stir fried sweet potato noodle with thinly sliced veggies, including capsicum, carrots, black fungus, mushrooms and beef. The slippery sweet potato noodles were sweet and salty, with a strong sesame flavour from the ample use of sesame oil, a staple in Korean cuisine. Despite this being a quite pedestrian dish usually, I actually really enjoyed it.

Cheese Bukdak – $19.00

The fiery colour of the stir fried chicken caught our eyes first, and this was actually quite spicy. The chicken pieces were quite tender, and the cheese toned down the spiciness slightly. The strong spicy flavour meant that it was a great dish to have with a plain bowl of rice, but if you can’t handle a lot of heat, I’d say give this a miss, or be prepared to be drinking plenty of water after every bite.

Everything that we tried at Gukbab was quite authentic, and the restaurant is great for a bigger gathering, given the extensiveness of the menu, ranging from stews, fried chicken, bibimbab, hot plates and even bingsu!

The byu-dagi guk bab is said to be the signature dish of the restaurant, and I definitely look forward to trying it out on my next visit, just gotta wait until the 40 degrees days are over.

How to get here:
Gukbab is located on Little Lonsdale Street, just two minutes walk away from Flagstaff station.

GUKBAB Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Advieh

I know I know, I said I’m over brunches. But when we’re talking about halloumi fries, homemade baklava, dukka toast and Middle Eastern platters, can I really say no that?

So here we are, trying to reconcile a wobbly relationship we’ve been having with brunch at Advieh, a cafe that does both brunch and dinner on certain days of the week, with a menu that promises great things.

The Middle Eastern flair does not stop at the menu at Advieh, the mosaic lanterns hanging from the ceiling, Moroccan-style tiles, and the dark and moody lighting were all reminiscent of a riad.

Iced Chai

It was quite warm on the day and some ice-cold drinks were on order. Although the iced chai was not present on the menu, the waitress was happy to put in an order for us. The spice blend was quite strong, which is actually quite rare to come by in Melbourne, most chais being on the watery side of things.

Iced Coffee – $5.50

My caffeine fix for the day came in the form of iced coffee. The drink was robust and a breeze to drink, keeping me cool in the process.

Mix Grill – $22.50

Advish’s take on the mix grill plate looked light and refreshing, and consisted of three Moroccan meatballs, a piece of grilled chicken shish, hummous and two salads of your choosing. There were three salads to choose from on the day, and after a long deliberation, we settled on the potato salad and the chickpea salad.

Mix Grill – $22.50

The meatballs were my favourite on the plate. The were juicy and flavoursome, benefiting from the ample use of spices. The chicken shish on the other hand, was a little dry, but made all better when had with the hummous. The use of vinaigrette and parsley meant that the potato salad was a touch lighter than your traditional mayo heavy variety. The creamy chickpea salad was another winner, this is the type of salad that I can get behind!

Dukka – $18.50 w/ extra egg – $2.50

The size of the dukka toast was the first thing I noticed, Advieh definitely isn’t shy with their servings. The pairing of pesto and avocado is ingenuous, and one that I’ve actually never tried before, with the earthiness of the pesto contrasting beautifully with the creaminess indulgence of the avocado.

Halloumi Fries (large) – $13.00

The halloumi fries were fried in a light batter, and the yoghurt sauce drizzled on top counterbalanced the saltiness of the squeaky fries. The pops of pomegranate also added some freshness to the plate.

Advieh is something special. With its succinct but versatile menu, friendly and unpretentious service, and reasonably priced and more-than-reasonably portioned food, it left me with a re-found appreciation for brunch. I’m already planning a re-visit to give their dinner menu a try.

How to get here:
Advish is located on Gamon Street, a short six minutes walk from Seddon Station, which is on the Werribee line.

I dined as a guest of Advieh.

Advieh Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato