Little Sichuan

Little Sichuan is another creation under the Dainty Sichuan group, and it started off by offering maocai and ganguo, two variations of Sichuan dishes that are similar but not quite the same as Malatang.

It’s since jumped on the malatang train though, and has a similar setup to other malatang restaurants. You’re given a bowl to fill to your heart’s content at $3.28 per 100 grams, choose a soup base out of the five options, and grabbing a number to bring back to your table.

Pan Fried Pork Buns – $10.80

Little Sichuan also have a number of flour-based dishes, and we couldn’t go past the pan fried pork buns. The buns were fluffy on top with a crispy bottom, and looked straight out of a movie. The little warning flag wasn’t kidding, these buns were bursting with juice, and is seriously a burning hazard!

Malatang

Onto the star of the show, the Malatang! I picked Sichuan spicy as my soup base. Some of my favourite toppings at Little Sichuan that are not commonly found include the home-made fried pork and wide sweet potato noodle. I also really liked the fried peas on top, they added a nice crunch to the Malatang. Although the soup smelt great, there was a lot of oil on top, and the soup itself was quite thin, this meant that I pretty just picked all the goodies from the soup without drinking much of it.

We visited Little Sichuan after scoring a deal on EatClub, and the truth is, I probably wouldn’t be rushing back. Sure the pork buns were delicious, but I’ve had better Malatang elsewhere, and the slightly higher price tag just wasn’t worth it.

How to get here:
Little Sichuan is located inside QV, which is right opposite Melbourne Central.

Dainty Sichuan - Little Sichuan Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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Tanghuo Kungfu

I went back to China for a month at the beginning of 2018, and that’s when I realised that Malatang has taken over the world by storm. Combined with meal delivery apps and ride-sharing services, those three things helped me in surviving one of the coldest winters in Nanjing, with more snow than the city had seen in decades.

Malatang joints started popping up in the suburbs with a high concentration of Chinese population first in Melbourne, before taking over the city, to the point where there are pretty much a Malatang restaurant every 50 metres in the CBD.

The idea of malatang is quite ingenious really, I like to think of as hot pot for one. After grabbing a large bowl and a pair of tongs, choose from fresh ingredients including vegetables, meats, seafood, soy-based products and all the balls you can think of are. Once you’ve put in way too much food in your bowl because you want to try a bit of this and a bit of that, walk to the counter where you’ll be asked whether you want everything served in a soup or have it dry, and choose the appropriate spice and tingle level (the sensation that Sichuan peppercorn leaves on your lips), pay for your goods by weight, and then settle back at a table, and before long, a bowl of piping hot Malatang will be set in front of you.

Tanghuo Kungfu hails from China, and was one of the first Malatang restaurants in Melbourne, having opened its Box Hill location in 2017, and expanded into the city last year. The city location is sleek and a lot larger than other Malatang restaurants, complete with a sauce station and self-serve water dispensers. There is no shortage of food selection, and the service was very friendly, with staff greeting you at the door.

Left: Rose Oolong – $5.00
Right: Cherry Blossom Green Tea – $5.00

Tanghuo Kungfu has an additional tea station, which makes a lot of sense, as Malatang can be on the heavy side due to all the spices, and sipping on green tea throughout the meal helps to lighten things up. The bottles are also cute and portable, meaning that you can take it with you once you’re done and use it as a makeshift water bottle!

Malatang – $3/100g

Regardless of variety, everything goes for $3 per 100 grams, with the minimum spending of $12 per bowl, making the maths quite easy. I chose the traditional Malatang, with high spice level and medium tingling level. The soup is what differentiates each Malatang restaurant for me, and the version at Tanghuo Gongfu is quite good. It has clearly been boiled for hours, resulting in a complex depth of flavour, and there is a sweet after taste. My favourite toppings to add to malatangs include tofu puffs, seafood money bags, Chinese cabbage, crown daisy, sliced lamb, pork and mushroom balls, bamboo shoot, quail eggs just to name a few. It’s always fun to pick and choose from the selections available, but watch out, as things can get out of hand really quickly!

Malaban – $3/100g

We also tried the Malaban for the sake of variety. The dressing that all the goodies are doused is primarily made of sesame and chilli oil, and the sweet after taste that I really liked in the soup rendition did not fare as well here, being overly sweet to the point of cloying. We both agreed that Malatang was the better choice in this case.

Malatang is great both as a quick lunch or a late night meal, its versatility being its biggest selling point. You can make it more substantial by adding in some noodles, or keep it light by choosing mainly vegetables, the choice is completely yours. With Tanghuo Kungfu opening from lunchtime to the early hours of the morning daily, it is definitely somewhere worth trying out Malatang at!

How to get here:
Tanghuo Kungfu is located on Elizabeth Street, a short five minutes walk from Melbourne Central.

I dined as a guest of Tanghuo Kungfu.

Tanghuo Kungfu Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato